New Zealand Workshops

The Click That Teaches instructor, Mary Concannon will be giving at least two workshops in New Zealand early next year.  The first two workshops are for complete beginners.  No previous knowledge is required for either horse or handler.

The first is on 11th and 12th January in Waimauku, Auckland hosted by Monique Masoe.  For bookings or further information contact: Monique at (64) 21 150 9513 or email:

The following week, 18/19th January, the workshop will be in Whatawhata, Hamilton.  Karen Drummond of Learning About Dogs is the organiser here.  You can contact Karen for more details at (64) 21 655054 or email

Keep an eye out for details of other workshops in NZ in February.

Liberty clicker training

Liberty clicker training

Looking forward to meeting new clicker trainers from this part of the world!

Shaping ……What is it?

‘Shaping’ is the process of growing a behaviour in small increments.

It’s a little bit like the children’s game where you are directed to a place by someone saying that you’re cool (not too close) cold (wrong direction altogether), warm (right general direction) or hot (right there!).

The main difference is that when we shape a behaviour with animals, we only use ‘yes’ (warm/hot) answers.  We start by capturing a tiny bit of the behaviour we want to shape.  So, for example, if we want to shape head lowering to the ground, we simply observe the horse until we see his head dip down a fraction…click and treat.  Then watch to see if this is repeated, CT.  Capture this a few times and then wait for the horse to drop his head a little lower before clicking.  Very quickly your horse will recognise what’s happening and we continue clicking and treating each increment of head lowering until the horse is consistently lowering his head to the ground.

Aoife Stephens used this technique as part of her Young Scientist project in 2011 while she was in transition year in school  This video shows her working with a pony with no previous clicker training experience.

We can use as many steps or thin-slices as needed to go from the start to a finished behaviour….In scientific terms these are known as successive approximations.

Guidelines for successful shaping:

  • For this exercise, it’s important that your horse is completely free to leave the game. He can be at liberty in a paddock or loose in his stable.  The space doesn’t have to be huge but if he chooses to walk away, he must be free to do so.  In the video above you see Aoife working with a pony in an open shed where the pony can move away from her.
  • For a novice horse/pony or an animal you don’t know well, use protective contact. This means work behind a barrier as Aoife is doing here.  In this case it’s a very simple set-up with a rope strung across the front of the shed so that she can stay out of the pony’s space if he starts to mug her for food.  You can work behind a gate to a field, over a fence etc.
  • Keep your sessions short.  Take about twenty treats and when they’re all gone, finish your session (use a consistent signal to show the session is over e.g. show your empty hands)
  • When you finish a session move well away so as not to tease your horse.  This gives your horse a mental break.  The break need only be a few minutes…enough time to refill your pocket/pouch and assess how your session went.
  • Accept the slightest try to start with….a muscle twitch, or a few millimetres of movement, etc
  • Festina Lente…for the latin scholars.  It means make haste slowly.  Be prepared to put in lots and lots of steps/thin slices between the starting point and the finished behaviour.  It may seem like you’re taking longer but the learning is much better and its often quicker.
  • Have fun!  Think of this as a game, not work and it becomes a pleasure for both you and your horse!!


The Dreaded Donkey…and Rope-Handling skills

donkeyMIsty never liked donkeys.  She hated the noise they made and even the look of them. For years, our normally calm, relaxed, easy-going family cob became distinctly upset in the vicinity of donkeys.  This has mellowed over the years but I have always, for the past 18 or so years, been ‘donkey aware’ when out riding.

Newbie is a thoroughbred, with all the excitable and quick characteristics of the breed.  The first time we met a donkey, out walking in hand, I became anxious.  This was in our early months together and we were doing lots of targetting (can you touch the gate, scary bag in the ditch, dustbin, etc) for clicks and treats…….I could hardly ask him to touch the donkey!  However, much to my amazement, he was completely unfazed by the donkey once he spotted him.  I was always conscious of giving him time to see and observe other animals, donkeys, goats, sheep etc, as we came across them though.

Roll on many years to recently when we were returning home after an enjoyable hack around the parish. I knew that one of my neighbours had a donkey in his garden on temporary lawnmower duty and so as we came up to the house I made Newbie stop and look over the wall at said donkey who was tethered to a large metal pole in the centre of the lawn. The donkey looked at us but he was safely ensconsed behind a cattle grid. Calm and relaxed, we pottered on. Thirty or so yards down the road we heard an horrendous noise of metal banging on metal then metal on concrete and we both whirled around to see donkey galloping down the road towards us followed by a length of rope and metal pole hopping, banging and clanging behind him.

Newby dismount 2 (800x600) (2)We both reacted….Newbie’s thought was to wheel around and head for the hills, while my reaction was to slide down the reins and ask for head lowering. To my relief and delight, the head lowering response outweighed the “I’m out of here” response and Newbie stopped and dropped his head long enough for me to slide off his back.  Phew!!!!!

Donkey had now caught up with us and was quite determined to check out Newbie’s rear end.  So now Newbie was trying to avoid being followed by this creature while kicking out and circling me all at the same time.  I kept Newbie from running over me using my tai-chi rope handling skills (taught by Alexandra Kurland – the Tai Chi Wall keeps the horse’s shoulder over and away from the handler….more of this later).

Fortunately for us, another neighbour pulled up in her car, jumped out and asked how she could help.  I asked her to open the gate to an adjacent field and lead Newbie in, closely followed by donkey.  We had to move well into the field to allow donkey, rope and metal pole all get inside.  Newbie and I then made a dash for the gate and the neighbour closed it just in time to keep donkey in.

We then stood catching our breath while I repeatedly had Newbie drop his head CT, drop head CT, until we were both calm enough to walk on.  I was never more grateful for having practised a technique as much as I had practised head-lowering!

An Icey Experience

In mid September I had the pleasure of visiting Oakfield Farm in Dorset, England, to give a clicker training workshop.  Nick Foot has been producing Icelandic horses here for a number of years and they are truly a wonderful breed.

photo 3 (2)For those of you who are not familiar with “Iceys” they are really pony sized, being anywhere from 12 to over 14 hands high (122-148cm) and originate in Iceland (as the name suggests!)  Their size belies their strength! They come in an array of colours. Icelandics are the only horse found in Iceland which allows no importation of horses, and if they leave the country (even for competition), they are not permitted to return.

riding trackAs well as the usual three gaits that ‘normal’ horses have i.e.,walk, trot and canter/gallop, they have two additional gaits.  The ‘tolt’ is a fast, ground-covering four beat gait and the ‘pace’ is a very rapid smooth gait.

When I saw Brynja, who was a sturdy little mare but only something over 13 hands…I did ask…Are you sure?.  My own thoroughbred is 16.2hh approx and I looked at this little creature with a degree of wariness.  I need not have worried!!!!

Riding an Icey in tolt was described to me as being akin to a fast spin in a small sports-car and how true that is.  Its a wonderful sensation, fast, smooth and low to the ground.  We had a lovely ride from the farm through lanes and tracks over the gorgeous Dorset countryside and I came back with a grin from ear to ear!!


Sitting and chilling!

Can your horse stand quietly beside you while you do other things? It’s great to have a horse that is patient and will wait happily beside you while you say, open a gate, answer the phone, chat to a neighbour, but many horses are not patient by nature and so you need to train this as a behaviour.Aoife sit chill

Here Aoife is sitting in the arena and Rua is learning to stand quietly beside her. When he’s relaxed, happy and keeping his distance from her, she clicks and treats to tell him that’s the behaviour she wants. As Rua learns patience, the time between clicks becomes ever longer.Aoife sit chill CT

Sunny Day

Summer has finally come to Kerry!  Too hot for riding in the middle of the day, so Newbie and I went for a walk and a potter in the tide.

The Dismount!

It’s wonderful when you have extra people around with cameras who are willing to take pictures when you work.  We have just had an amazing clinic with Alexandra Kurland in Kerry and there were several photographers on hand.   On day one, after a lovely ride on Newbie, we ended up with him standing on a mat.  One of the things that I now take for granted with my clicker trained horse is that he will stand and wait patiently while I perform whatever tasks are necessary around him.  In this case it was simply dismounting and putting the saddle away but when seeing the series of photos, made me think, once again, about how effective clicker training is at producing really well behaved horses!


Clinic with Alexandra Kurland

Alexandra Kurland is giving a three day clinic near Tralee, Co Kerry Ireland…why not take advantage of Ryanair flights to Kerry airport (30 min away) to come and have a wonderful break in Kerry while learning new skills.

alex taking photoLearn how to communicate clearly with your horse, solve common problems, improve performance and build a great partnership!

3 Day Clicker Training Clinic with Alexandra Kurland at, The Irish Clicker Centre, Tralee, Co Kerry, Ireland. May 31st to 2nd June 2013

This 3 day clinic starts with introductions on the evening of Thurs 30th May, followed by 3 full clinic days from 31st May to 2nd June

There are limited horse places available on the clinic. Book early to avoid disappointment. Auditor/Without horse places are available.  Everyone who attends is a full participant and will have hands-on learning throughout the day.

Panda_Albany_restaurant_010Alexandra Kurland is the foremost equine clicker trainer in the world and is the author of a range of books and DVDs.

Enquiries and Bookings: phone Mary on (353)87-1370162  email: